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Monday, November 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dieulacres Abbey, Staffordshire found in the catalog.

Dieulacres Abbey, Staffordshire

Michael John Carding Fisher

Dieulacres Abbey, Staffordshire

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Published by (Hill Bros) in (Leek (Staffs.)) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dieulacres Abbey.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby M. J. C. Fisher.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination(1),63p. :
    Number of Pages63
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15334705M
    ISBN 100950055603

    Michael Fisher, Dieulacres Abbey, Churnet Valley Books. John L. Tomkinson, Monastic Staffordshire, Churnet Valley Books. Victoria County History Staffordshire, Volume 3, Religious Houses. Victoria County History, Staffordshire, Volume 7, Leek and the Moorlands.


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Dieulacres Abbey, Staffordshire by Michael John Carding Fisher Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dieulacres Abbey, by Michael J. Fisher, MA, of King Edward VI Grammar School, Stafford, published in Leek Public Library. The Buildings of England, Staffordshire, Dieulacres Abbey Nikolaus Pevsner, Penguin,ISBN 0 14 9 The Cistercian Abbeys of Britain, edited by David Robinson.

Dieulacres Abbey, Leek Staffordshire [Michael J. Fisher] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A six-page introduction is followed by nine chapters dealing with the abbey's foundation; its estates (in Cheshire and Lancashire as well as Staffordshire); the wool-trade; the abbey's relations with the crown; its dissolution; its buildings; and its chronicle.

A map and plan is provided, and in the centre there are some. Introduction containing information about the abbey’s founder and his family, more illustrative material and plans of the abbey site, and a chapter on the Dieulacres Chronicle which contains a unique record of the last years of Richard II’s reign and the revolution of   The Alben family originated from the Staffordshire village of Buekenhall, and when William became Abbot of Dieulacres he leased Rossall Grange to his kinsman, George, in whose family the property remained until [2] George’s grandson later rose to fame as Cardinal Allen, the founder of Douai College.

Dieulacres was founded in when the Abbey of St Mary and St Benedict was Staffordshire book from Poulton to a new location north of Leek, the abbey remained in use until when it was surrendered to the Crown.

The inventory made at the time of its dissolution consisted of the Abbot and twelve other monks, with 30 servants. The principal estate was centred on the old abbey site at Poulton, where there were 1, acres of arable land.

Close by were the granges of Dodleston and Churton, while between this group of estates and the Staffordshire border lay the vill Dieulacres Abbey Byley, given to the monks shortly before The abbey also owned salt-pits at Nantwich and Middlewich. The monument includes the standing structural and some of the buried remains of a Cistercian monastery known as Dieulacres Abbey, situated on the northern side of the Churnet valley.

Dieulacres was founded in when the Abbey of St Mary and St Benedict was moved from Poulton to a new location north of Leek, the abbey remained in use until.

THE CHRONICLE OF DIEULACRES ABBEY [1] Probably the most important document known to have come from Dieulacres is a tripartite Chronicle, much of which was compiled from various sources by an anonymous monk at the beginning of the fifteenth century: Grays Inn MS no.

How it came to be in a London Law Library is something of a mystery, but it is possible that it was passed on. Adjoining the house at right angles to the front, is an arched entrance gate dated shallow 4-centred archway of that date, ornamented (probably when the adjacent farm buildings were constructed c) with over-arch and pediment assembled from sculpted stone of abbey ruins: the pediment over the arch is made from sections of clustered.

The story of the last years of Dieulacres Abbey is closely interwoven with the series of national events which marked the beginning of the Reformation in England.

For several years before the attack on the monasteries began, there were rumours that the English Church was likely to undergo some kind of change, and Henry VIII’s “Great Matter” and. Bibliographic Title: Chartulary of Dieulacres Abbey. The William Salt Archaeological Society, G. Wrottesley. Collections for a History of Staffordshire, New Series V Harrison and Sons, Harrison and Sons.

London. Series: Collections for a History of Staffordshire Order Name: Cistercian Institution(s): Dieulacres Abbey. Buy Dieulacres Abbey, Leek Staffordshire 2nd Edition by Fisher, Michael J. (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Michael J.

Fisher. The Cistercian abbey of Dieulacres beside the Churnet a mile north of Leek was founded in by Ranulph de Blundeville, Earl of Chester, possibly on the site of a former hermitage.

The story is that Ranulph, after the dissolution of his first marriage in followed by a second marriage in orhad a vision, while in bed, of his grandfather, Ranulph de Gernon, Earl of Chester.

Dieulacres Abbey Dieulacres Abbey was a Cistercian monastery established by Ranulf, Earl of Chester at Poulton in Cheshire. It moved to the present site in the valley of the river Churnet, to the north-west of Leek in Staffordshire inpossibly in part as a result from raids at the former site by the Welsh.

Dieulacres Abbey, Leek, Staffordshire. Statement of Responsibility: by Michael J. Fisher Authors: Fisher, Michael J. (Main Author) Format: Books/Monographs Language: English Publication: [S.l.: s.n., ] Subject Class: /D2 K2. Add to Print List Remove from Print List Notes. Dieulacres is a hamlet in the parish of Leek.

View. We are on A. But the story of Abbey Green, Staffordshire begins in Poulton. Ranulph II de Gernon, the fourth Earl of Chester, was – like many Norman lords – deeply concerned for his own soul. As such, lords often made sure to set up monasteries and. Chartulary of Dieulacres Abbey by George Wrottesley; 1 edition; First published in ; Subjects: Abbeys, Dieulacres Abbey (Staffordshire, England); Places: England, Staffordshire.

Dieulacres Abbey Paperback – 1 May that it is the description of the history of a relatively small localised monastic establishment in the `wilds' of the Staffordshire moorlands that is not only researched in vigorous detail but is also written in a highly-readable style.

It is a model to which other less-professionally written local /5(3). Details. LEEK SJ95NE ABBEY GREEN ROAD /1/6 (East side) 13/04/51 Dieu-la-Cres Abbey ruins. Chronicle written at the Cistercian Abbey of Dieulacres in Staffordshire, surviving in London, Gray's Inn, ms.

9, fol. The following is a list of monastic houses in Staffordshire, England. Alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Knights Templars and Knights Hospitaller).The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the.

Dieu-La-Cres Abbey Ruins is a Grade II listed building in Leek, Staffordshire, England. See why it was listed, view it on a map, see visitor comments and photos. I was lucky to find that Gloria had deposited a copy of her book The Mountforts of the Moorlands at the William Salt Library in Stafford.

Most of the information on this page is taken from Gloria's book expanded by material from Michael Fisher's online Dieulacres Abbey, Leek, Staffordshire.

The 17th century farmhouse is situated within the lands of the former Abbey of Dieu l'Acres. It has possibly incorporated the gateway to the former abbey. The abbey was established in by Ranulf de Blundeville, Earl of Chester. The building has now been divided into 2 dwellings, after extensive renovation work.

Location Staffordshire Leek. DIEULACRES, a hamlet in Leek parish, Stafford; ½ a mile N of Leek. A Cistertian abbey was founded here, inby Blundeville, Earl of Chester; and given, by Edward VI. to the Baggenholts. The edifice is known to have been large and beautiful; but very few traces of it exist.

The location is that of the abbey ruins north of Leek. Hulton Abbey was the last of three Cistercian monasteries to be founded in north Staffordshire.

The other two monasteries, at Croxden and Dieulacres, are the subjects of separate schedulings. Documentary sources indicate that the abbey at Hulton was never very wealthy, despite having acquired substantial estates in the vicinity during the 13th. Carved stones from abbey used to ornament the building in a highly deliberate decorative scheme, the ornamentation largely concentrated over the openings, and using roof bosses, fragments of tracery, vaulting ribs etc.

Single-storeyed byre wing has similar doors and windows in inner face, and its gable wall is ornamented with abbey sculpture.

The Gawain poet's use of certain terms to describe landscape, an interest in hydrology, and a connection to Dieulacres abbey, indicate that the author was most likely a clerk of a Cistercian abbey.

The poem was written in the dialect of an area where north Staffordshire meets the borders of Cheshire and Derbyshire, according to Angus McIntosh, language scholar. Before William Gould moved to The Lowe near Longnor in Staffordshire, and subsequently to Pilsbury Grange inhe and his ancestors had lived for generations at Herbage, high on the moorlands of Staffordshire between Leek and Longnor (1).

Although this place seems remote today, it was once on a strategically important long-distance route from west to East across England. Dieu-La-Cres Abbey Farmhouse is a Grade II listed building in Leek, Staffordshire, England. See why it was listed, view it on a map, see visitor comments and photos and share your own comments and photos of.

Dieulacres abbey, founded instood near the river Churnet in the south part of the township, and its granges were among the earliest settlements in what was an area of wooded countryside; the 'frith' element of the township's name means a wood.

The short. The Abbey Inn - near the old Dieulacres site Also, as befits the local station in whose area the poem is probably set, BBC Radio Stoke broadcast its own half-hour programme about the saga. The Staffordshire pipe rolls of the reigns of King Richard I and King John, A.D.

to A.D. Cox, H.C., Catalogue of the muniments and manuscript books pertaining to the dean and chapter of Lichfield; analysis of the Wrottesley, The Hon. G., The chartulary of Dieulacres abbey. Part. Round, J.H., A note on the tenure.

Gregory King's Note Book: and Staffordshire Parliamentary History () Notes on Staffordshire Families: Totmonslow Hearth Tax, Staffordshire Quarter Sessions Roll, Staffordshire Quarter Sessions Rolls, Staffordshire Quarter Sessions Rolls, texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Full text of "Collections for a history of Staffordshire"Missing: Dieulacres Abbey.

Ranulf died at Wallingford on 26 October[1] aged sixty. His viscera were buried at Wallingford Castle, his heart at Dieulacres Abbey, which he had founded, and the remainder of his body at St Werburg's in various estates were divided between his four sisters Matilda (Maud), Mabel, Agnes (Alice), and Hawise [5] as co-heirs.

Ranulf's second sister Mabel and his eldest sister. Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Full text of "The dissolution of the monasteries as illustrated by the suppression of the religious houses of Staffordshire [microform]" See other formats.

abbey abbot acres aforesaid Anne Anthracomya arms Ashenhurst Audley Bagnall beds Bradnop Carbonate Carboniferous chapel Cheddleton Cheshire Chetelton church Churnet Coal Measures Coal-sield Congleton consirmed curate dated daughter deed Delacresse Derby Dieulacres earl of Chester Edward 3rd Egerton Elizabeth Endon Erdeswick fossils Goniatites.

Dieulacres Abbey - on the site of Abbey Farm, Abbey Green Road, Leek, Staffordshire, United Kingdom. The coordinates should be 53° 6'"N, 2° 1'"W. The current link is to a point on the B (road) near Kilnsey, North Yorkshire BD23 5PT, United Kingdom.

Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Full text of "The dissolution of the monasteries: as illustrated by the suppression of religious houses of Staffordshire".Try the new Google Books.

Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. The Charigulary of Dieulacres Abbey from an ancient. Other editions - View all. Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Volume 6, Part 1 Staffordshire Record Society Full view - Collections for a History of.The Ashes near Endon in Staffordshire is a building of historical significance and is Grade II* listed on the English Heritage Register.

It was built in the 17th Century probably by Sir John Bellot and was the home of many notable residents for the next three centuries.